APFANEWS

Archive for December, 2010

UDHR Day and Southern Bhutan Problem

On the occasion of celebration of the 62nd Universal Human Rights Day 10th December 2010, the world leaders, Human rights activists and UN secretary general and UN Human Rights commissioner sent messages calling the world for peace, tolerance and respect of human rights and rights of human person. Show human compassion and kindness. No one […]

Published on Dec 29 2010 // News Analysis

King’s Democracy endangers Bhutan’s sovereignty

When the 4th monarch, King Jigme Singe Wangchuk proclaimed abdication from his golden throne in favour of the crown prince Jigme Khesar Namgyal Wangchuk on December 17, 2006 at Trashi Yangtse, a far flung district headquarters in the east Bhutan, world was astonished to see that an absolute monarch was changing the skin colour to […]

Published on Dec 26 2010 // Commentary

Continuing Tradition of Immigration

BY Scott H DeLisi : It is a matter of pleasure to be here to join with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, International Organization for Migration, the colleagues from Bhutan and with the core-group and all of you to mark this very special occasion –departure of the 40,000th Bhutanese refugee from Nepal. I think it is a great day and the weather has cooperated, as well. I know I speak from the fellow core-group members. When I say the US is proud to work with such a tremendous group of partners to provide a durable solution to our refugees from Bhutan

Published on Dec 17 2010 // Opinion, Video

Continuing Tradition of Immigration

It is a matter of pleasure to be here to join with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, International Organization for Migration, the colleagues from Bhutan and with the core-group and all of you to mark this very special occasion –departure of the 40,000th Bhutanese refugee from Nepal. I think it is a great […]

Published on Dec 17 2010 // Opinion

In my frail conditions …

There were 105 prisoners at the Damphu jail. The jailers began to threaten us, that if we wanted to stay in Bhutan then our prison term would prolong, or alternatively we could opt to leave the country. When I was asked what I wanted to do, I used to answer, that as three generations of my family had lived on the same land, why should I leave the country, when I haven’t done anything wrong? Enraged with my answer, they use to beat me heavily with sticks or intimidate me showing a piece of hot iron to change my statement and leave the country.

Out of 105, 24 prison inmates were released after they signed Voluntary Migration Forms, to leave Bhutan permanently. The rest of us were transferred to Chemgang prison near the capital, Thimphu.

Published on Dec 09 2010 // Untold Story